Monthly Archives: February 2014

Chicken and Cabbage Salad

chickencabbage salad

Not long ago I talked about my love for the roasted chicken and its many uses. What I didn’t tell you is that more than anything I love the rotisserie chicken you pick up at the grocery, the one that they have cooked for you. The appeal is obvious-no cooking for me tonight! My work is done. If you are not one to sit at the table and assail the roasted chicken with your bare hands but want a more civilized experience here is an easy way to add a few other things into the mix and have a nice one plate meal.

  • The meat from one rotisserie chicken, shredded
  • ½ head of a small red cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and shredded
  • 4 scallions, sliced
  • ½ small red onion thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup fresh chopped cilantro
  • Sesame-ginger salad dressing

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl, dress with your favorite sesame-ginger salad dressing to you liking.

Glazed Lemon Loaf

lemonloafThis lemon loaf lives somewhere between being a bread and a cake-let’s call it a sweet bread. It’s not too sweet but has a lovely glaze that gives it a little kick. As this winter drags on, relentlessly, I need a little kick of lemon to remember what summer tastes like.

Ingredients:

  • Canola oil cooking spray
  • 1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • Finely shredded zest of 1 large lemon
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup 1-percent-fat milk
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

For the glaze: 

  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • Juice of 1 large lemon (about 3 1/2 Tbs.)

Directions:

Preheat an oven to 350°F. Coat an 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-inch loaf pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, lemon zest and salt until well mixed. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, canola oil and vanilla until blended. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Using a rubber spatula, mix until they are just combined, forming a thick, slightly lumpy batter. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, spreading it with the spatula to make it smooth and even on top. The pan will be about half full.

Bake until it is deeply browned with some golden cracks on top and it feels springy to the touch when pressed lightly in the middle, about 40 minutes. For an alternative test, insert a knife into the center: it should come out clean. If after 40 minutes the edges are getting dark but the center is not done, turn the temp down to 325°F and bake for 5-10 more minutes. Transfer the pan to a wire rack and insert a thin knife vertically into the cake in 8 to 10 uniformly spaced places.

To make the glaze, in a small, heavy nonreactive saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the sugar and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Continue to boil until the mixture is bubbling and frothy on the surface, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately pour evenly over the surface of the hot cake.

Let the glazed cake cool completely in the pan on the rack. Run a thin-bladed knife around the inside edge of the pan to loosen the cake. Carefully invert the cake onto the rack and lift off the pan. Turn upright onto a serving plate, slice thinly and serve. Store the cooled cake tightly wrapped at room temperature for up to 4 days.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma, Essentials of Healthful Cooking, by Mary Abbott Hess, Dana Jacobi & Marie Simmons (Oxmoor House, 2003).

Potato Lentil Salad with a Garlic Mustard Vinaigrette

Purple potatoes are pretty.

Purple potatoes are pretty.

I got these beautiful purple potatoes from my winter CSA share and really wanted to share them with someone-why not you? They look so nice next to lentils, which are not known for their good looks. Or taste for that matter. I think of lentils as one of the more blah foods out there even though they’re healthy and full of good stuff for you and all that, I still need to disguise them with other ingredients to reap their benefits. You can buy lentils in a can, which eliminates the overnight soaking or whatever those people who write recipes and don’t have babies will tell you to do (look for them with the Goya canned goods if you have a hard time finding them in your store).

This is a fantastic example of a make-in-stages recipe. The dressing can be made hours ahead of time. Potatoes can be boiled and left to cool at any point. After that, it’s just throwing things together in a serving bowl. Keeps for 3 days refrigerated in an air-tight container.

  • 1 lb potatoes, peeled
  • 1 15 oz can lentils, drained and rinsed
  • Salt and pepper

Dressing

  • 2 large shallots finely diced,
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced or smashed to a paste
  • 1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup of your favorite olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons capers, rinsed if salted, drained if brined, and roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons pickle relish
  • 1 to 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup chopped flat leaf parsley

Make the dressing: Place the chopped shallot and red wine vinegar in the bottom of a small bowl and let sit for 5 minutes. Whisk in minced garlic, dijon, a pinch of salt, a few grinds of black pepper and olive oil. Stir in chopped capers, relish and scallions.

In a large pot cover the potatoes with 2 inches of cold water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer until potatoes a re soft when poked with a sharp knife. Remove and let cool enough to handle. Cut into 1 inch pieces.

Assemble salad:  Place potatoes in a serving bowl. Add lentils, dressing and all but 1 tablespoon of parsley and combine. Adjust seasoning with additional salt and pepper if needed. Scatter salad with remaining parsley and serve.